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Pavement Conditions CSF
Pavement Conditions CSF

Pavement Conditions CSFs

Priority System Pavement Conditions

WHAT:

The Priority System metrics assess our roadways from visual inspections of pavements that determine the severity and extent of various distress types. Common distresses include potholes, rutting, faulting and different types of cracking.


HOW:

The Pavement Condition Rating (PCR) method measures the distress level for a section of pavement on a scale from zero to 100, with 100 being the best. The system average PCR is weighted by traffic, length, and number of lanes. Predetermined sections are measured using the PCR method, including various passes over each section and measured stops along the way to
visually inspect the pavement outside of the vehicle. The agency then calculates the system average PCR by factoring the rating for each section by its traffic, length and number of lanes. Each system type – priority, general and urban – are calculated separately, with the target being above the stated goal. There are 13,733 miles of lanes on the priority system, 29,546 miles of lanes on the general system and 6,117 miles of lanes on the urban system.

WHEN:

PCR is collected once each State Fiscal Year (July 1st – June 30th) for ODOT’s entire state highway system. The data is reported monthly as counties are completed during the collection season (April to December) and published annually in the CSF Dashboard.

WHERE:

Rating teams drive across ODOT’s entire state highway system to rate our pavement conditions.

WHO:

Trained raters from the Office of Pavement Engineering in Central Office conduct the PCR inspections from which each system’s average ratings are calculated. The Office of Systems Planning and Program Management in Central Office reports the data.

General System Pavement Conditions

WHAT:

The General System metrics assess our roadways from visual inspections of pavements that determine the severity and extent of various distress types. Common distresses include potholes, rutting, faulting and different types of cracking.


HOW:

The Pavement Condition Rating (PCR) method measures the distress level for a section of pavement on a scale from zero to 100, with 100 being the best. The system average PCR is weighted by traffic, length, and number of lanes. Predetermined sections are measured using the PCR method, including various passes over each section and measured stops along the way to
visually inspect the pavement outside of the vehicle. The agency then calculates the system average PCR by factoring the rating for each section by its traffic, length and number of lanes. Each system type – priority, general and urban – are calculated separately, with the target being above the stated goal. There are 13,733 miles of lanes on the priority system, 29,546 miles of lanes on the general system and 6,117 miles of lanes on the urban system.

WHEN:

PCR is collected once each State Fiscal Year (July 1st – June 30th) for ODOT’s entire state highway system. The data is reported monthly as counties are completed during the collection season (April to December) and published annually in the CSF Dashboard.

WHERE:

Rating teams drive across ODOT’s entire state highway system to rate our pavement conditions.

WHO:

Trained raters from the Office of Pavement Engineering in Central Office conduct the PCR inspections from which each system’s average ratings are calculated. The Office of Systems Planning and Program Management in Central Office reports the data.